10 exiting places you perhaps didn’t know existed

Some hand made and natural marvels of the world. Perhaps to put on your “must-visit” list? Check them out…

av Should you ever be in need of health care in these locations than look on Medihoo

1. Semuc Champey, Guatemala

40 Wonders of the World - 01Semuc Champey is a natural monument in the department of Alta Verapaz, Guatemala, near the Q’eqchi’ Maya town of Lanquín. It consists of a natural 300 m limestone bridge, under which passes the Cahabón River. (Wikipedia)

2. Viñales Valley, Cuba

40 Wonders of the World - 02
The valley has an area of 132 km2 (51 sq mi) and is located in the Sierra de los Órganos mountains (part of Guaniguanico range), just north of Viñalesm in the Pinar del Río Province. (Wikipedia)

3. Mount Roraima, Venezuela

40 Wonders of the World - 03
Mount Roraima lies on the Guiana Shield in the southeastern corner of Venezuela’s 30,000-square-kilometre (12,000 sq mi) Canaima National Park forming the highest peak of Guyana’s Highland Range. The tabletop mountains of the park are considered some of the oldest geological formations on Earth, dating back to some two billion years ago in the Precambrian. (Wikipedia)

4. Palais Ideal du Facteur Cheval, France

40 Wonders of the World - 04April 1879. During one of his rounds, Ferdinand Cheval, rural postman, 43, stumbles against such an odd stone that it awakes a dream. Real self-taught, he devotes 33 years of his life to build a dream palace in his garden alone. His inspiration comes from nature, postcards and the very first illustrated magazines that he deals. (Palais Ideal)

5. Chapelle St-Michel d’Aiguilhe, France

40 Wonders of the World - 05Saint-Michel d’Aiguilhe is a chapel in Aiguilhe, near Le Puy-en-Velay, France, built in 962 on a volcanic plug 85 metres (279 ft) high. The chapel is reached by 268 steps carved into the rock. It was built to celebrate the return from the pilgrimage of Saint James. (Wikipedia) – Website: Rocher St Michel

6. Ruins of Leptis Magna, Libya

40 Wonders of the World - 06Leptis Magna was a prominent city of the Roman Empire. Its ruins are located in Khoms, Libya, 130 km (81 mi) east of Tripoli, on the coast where the Wadi Lebda meets the sea. The site is one of the most spectacular and unspoiled Roman ruins in the Mediterranean. (Wikipedia)

7. The Archeological Site of Meroë, Sudan

40 Wonders of the World - 07
Meroë is an ancient city on the east bank of the Nile about 6 km north-east of the Kabushiya station near Shendi, Sudan, approximately 200 km north-east of Khartoum. Near the site are a group of villages called Bagrawiyah. This city was the capital of the Kingdom of Kush for several centuries. The Kushitic Kingdom of Meroë gave its name to the Island of Meroë, which was the modern region of Butana, a region bounded by the Nile (from the Atbarah River to Khartoum), the Atbarah and the Blue Nile. (Wikipedia)

8. Cuicul (Djémila), Algeria

40 Wonders of the World - 08In 1982, Cuicul (Djémila) became a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its unique adaptation of Roman architecture to a mountain environment. Significant buildings in ancient Cuicul include a theatre, two fora, temples, basilicas, arches, streets, and houses. The exceptionally well preserved ruins surround the forum of the Harsh, a large paved square with an entry marked by a majestic arch. (Wikipedia)

9. Lauca World Biosphere Reserve

40 Wonders of the World - 09
Lauca is a Biosphere Reserve, located in northern Chile, in Arica y Parinacota Region. The reserve comprises three protected areas: Lauca National Park, Las Vicuñas National Reserve and Salar de Surire Natural Monument. This zone was declared a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO in 1981. (Wikipedia)

10. Maelifell, Iceland

40 Wonders of the World - 10Mt. Mælifell (Measure-hill)  is located in southern Iceland and is about 800 meters tall,  it is reachable only by a four-wheeled vehicle and is on the southern Fjallabak road next to the glacier Mýrdalsjökull, the road is usually wet and sometimes even completely flooded. (Amazing Places)


List Source: Places You’ll See
Most of the text originates from Wikipedia

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