Panel Says Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Is A Disease, And Renames It

Chronic fatigue syndrome has been a controversial name and a controversial diagnosis.

A 15 member panel of the institute of Medicine – an independent government advisory body – redefines and renames the “chronic Fatigue Syndrome” and summarizes the scientific evidence to do so in a 235-page report.

The new name: systemic exertion intolerance disease, or SEID for short

Read more: NPR

NASA treadmill at Bournemouth hospital helps injured walk

Lesley Kingsley and James CreaseyA treadmill using technology designed for astronauts is being used to help patients in Bournemouth.

It will be used to help people with leg injuries and disorders recover, as they can exercise without putting their whole body weight on their legs.

Patients with arthritis of the knee joint and some with lower back pain, are zipped into a sealed bag which is then pumped with air.

Their body weight is reduced by as much as 80% while they use they machine.

Source: BBC

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Neurogeneticists harness immune cells to clear Alzheimer’s-associated plaques

New research from scientists at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) shows that the body’s immune system may be able to clear the brain of toxic plaque build-up that is the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, reversing memory loss and brain cell damage.

Read more: Sience Daily

Titan Krios: The insanely powerful $4m 3D microscope that could unravel cancer’s secrets

This is what sweat looks like up close - incredible 3D images are possible with the FEI Titan Krios telescope

This is what sweat looks like up close – incredible 3D images are possible with the FEI Titan Krios telescope

Scientists at Monash University in Australia have installed a powerful new microscope that is able to show atoms and molecules in super high definition 3D images, and could help to unravel the secrets of cancer and other diseases.

Read more: IBT

Diabetes Technology Inches Closer To An Artificial Pancreas

The pancreas, shown with the much smaller gall bladder, produces insulin that regulates glucose levels in the body.

Every person who uses insulin to manage diabetes wants what they don’t have — a replacement for their malfunctioning pancreas. And though the technology isn’t yet to the point of creating an artificial pancreas, it’s getting a lot closer.

Read more about it: NPR

Gamers Help Scientists Analyze 2.5 million Tumor Samples

A very inventive way of how to let ordinary people help reaserchers through gaming…

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Reverse the Odds, a mobile game developed by Cancer Research UK andChannel 4, invites users to find patterns in real tumor tissue in order to help scientists learn more about cancer.

This video explains what it is all about:

Source: BigThink

3D printing of body parts soon no longer to be science fiction?

Japan researchers target 3D-printed body parts

  Japanese scientists say they are on their way to being able to create custom-made skin, bone and joints using a 3D printer.
  Several groups of researchers around the world have developed small masses of tissue for implants, but now they are looking to take the next step and make them functional.

  Tsuyoshi Takato, a professor at the University of Tokyo Hospital, said his team had been working to create “a next-generation bio 3D printer”, which would build up thin layers of biomaterials to form custom-made parts.

  His team combines stem cells—the proto-cells that are able to develop into any body part—and proteins that trigger growth, as well as synthetic substance similar to human collagen.
  Using a 3D printer, they are working on “mimicking the structure of organs”—such as the hard surface and spongy inside for bones, Takato said.

  In just a few hours, the printer crafts an implant using data from a Computer Tomography (CT) scan.

  These implants can fit neatly into place in the body, and can quickly become assimilated by real tissue and other organs in the patient, the plastic surgeon said.

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Japan researchers target 3D-printed body parts

Japanese scientists say they are on their way to being able to create custom-made skin, bone and joints using a 3D printer. Several groups of researchers around the world have developed small masses of tissue for implants, but now they are looking to take the next step and make them functional.

Read more: PhysOrg